September 1972
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Day September 7, 1972

Thursday, September 7, 1972

This morning, I had a full hour’s chat with President Macapagal. Majority Floor Leader Edmundo (Munding) Cea and Vice Pres. Abraham (Abe) Sarmiento were with us part of the time. I was telling Macapagal that he had delivered a mesmerizing speech yesterday in favor of the ban-dynasty resolution. In fact I heard it said, by some delegates, that that was his finest hour.

I also suggested to Macapagal that there are perhaps two options for us. The first is to just simply freeze the ball and let the Convention work as slowly as possible so that the plebiscite on the new Constitution may only be done after the expiration of Marcos’ term in 1973. This would really, in effect, ban the incumbent. In fact, Convention secretary, Jose (Pepe) Abueva, has also suggested the same thing.

Another possibility, I said, was to declare a recess until January 1974.

We then talked about the transition government resolution filed by Oscar (Oka) Leviste and Antonio (Tony) Velasco. To my great surprise, Macapagal said what was almost unbelievable to me up to then—that this resolution might pass.

For some delegates, the point is, the ban-dynasty provision has already failed anyway; Marcos would surely win. Therefore, we might just as well postpone the election and hold over the positions of elective officials. The bonus is that we, the delegates, would be there in the first parliament. This is the substance and spirit of the Tony-Oka transition government resolution.

Incredible, I said. How can such a self-serving resolution pass? I remember now that Antonio (Tony) Tupaz had told me that definitely this would pass. I had dismissed the idea quickly then. But last night, Pepe Abueva was telling me that this just might pass really, for all we know. Macapagal sadly confirmed this: “Yes, that might even pass.”

This now seems to be a serious matter—where before, only Oka Leviste and Tony Velasco believed in it. But, of course, the come-on is irresistible. Who wouldn’t want to be in the first parliament—without even having to fight it out in an election contest?

 Macapagal did not know that Gary Teves and Adolfo (Adolf) Azcuña all along have been voting independently. Macapagal was quite surprised by what I said about Gary, because Gary’s uncle, Senator Teves, and his father, Congressman Teves, were allies of Marcos. I said, “Oh, yes, all along he has been with us.”

I like the kid. He is sincere and competent; I feel that young people like him should be encouraged and supported. He has voted independently of the way Congressman Teves and Senator Teves have been voting in Congress.

The other politician’s son who has surprisingly been consistently voting with us is Adolf Azcuña. The voting record of Adolf has really been progressive and independent. In fact, although he is an assistant attorney at the Bengzon law office, his record is poles apart from that of Peps Bengzon. In Adolf’s own words, some six months ago, his vote was 85 percent of the time different from that of Peps. Now, again, on the ban-Marcos resolution, he voted with us. He did not have second thoughts about his true colors.

Of course his local political rival, Ernesto (Erning) Amatong, is not very certain of Adolf s persuasions. Is he really independent of his father’s influence, this son of Congressman Azcuña? Nevertheless, Erning is a fair man and he has acknowledged to me that he is impressed by Adolf. He agrees with me that Adolf has been showing himself to be a sincere and independent-minded and conscientious young man.

Erning Amatong, as expected, voted with us. He is an old reliable, really. So did Vincenzo Sagun.

At noon, I went to the meeting of the Independent-Progressive bloc at the home of Pepe Calderon to discuss our options.

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September 7, 1972, Thursday

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(1)

9:10 PM

Sept. 7, 1972

Thursday

Malacañan Palace

Manila

 

Contingency Plans —

National Level

City of Manila Level

 

USAFIP, NL — the first greeters in this year’s birthday.

They came to see me at 1:00 PM after all the visitors and gave me five books, three of Marcuse, one of The Kennedy Legacy by Sorensen.

In the morning I met with Mayor Bagatsing with his Chief of Police, Gen. Tamayo, Deputy Chief, Col. Barbers, Col. Montoya,  CO of the Metrocom, Dir. Deleña and Com. Aquino as well as Deputy Com. Agcaoili of the Budget Commission.

The police will in the event of a contingency attend to what may be merely a local peace and order problem, but the moment there is street fighting the police leave the streets and allow the Metrocom and Gen. Ver’s forces to engage the enemy.

 

(2)

Sept. 7th (Con’t)

Malacañan Palace

Manila

 

This will prevent mistake encounters between our own men and forces as happened in Malaysia and even now in Ireland.

Sec. Ponce Enrile has just called me up to tell me that Sen. Aquino has asked to see him tonight on a matter of the highest urgency and of national importance.

I asked him to take security measures and to meet him only at a place of his choosing as Aquino is treacherous.

This afternoon I spent in finishing all papers needed for a possible proclamation of martial law, just in case it is necessary to do so.